Specify releases and cycles Specify requirements Run tests Submit and track defects Analyze data

How to Plan Tests in ALM

This task describes how to work with tests in ALM.

To learn more about requirements, see Test Plan Overview.

  1. Prerequisites

    A set of requirements is defined in the Requirements tree. For task details, see How to Use Requirements in ALM.

    Tip: You can automatically create tests based directly on your requirements in the Requirements module. For details, see the step for converting requirements to tests in the How to Create Requirements task.

  2. Create a test plan tree

    Create a test plan tree of test subject folders and tests. For task details, see How to Create Tests.

  3. Create dependencies with test resources – optional

    You can associate tests with a set of resources that you upload to the ALM repository.

    You can then view these dependencies and determine the resources that are in use. For task details, see How to Use Test Resources.

    Business Process Testing: You can associate component design steps with application area resources that you upload.

  4. Define test parameters

    To make tests more flexible, you can include parameters in test steps. This enables you to run the same test repeatedly and assign different values to the parameters. For task details, see How to Use Test Parameters.

  5. Define test configurations

    To run tests for different use-cases, you can define test configurations. This enables you to run the same test under different scenarios. For task details, see How to Work with Test Configurations.

  6. Create test steps

    Create test steps describing the operations to perform and their expected results. After you define the test steps, decide whether to perform the test manually or to automate it. For task details, see How to Design Test Steps.

  7. Automate tests

    After designing test steps, decide which tests to automate. Factors influencing test automation include frequency of execution, volume of data input, length of execution time, and complexity. For task details, see How to Design Test Steps.

    System Tests You can also create automated system tests that provide system information for a machine, capture a desktop image, or restart a machine. For task details, see How to Create System Tests.
    LeanFT Tests You can also create or import automated LeanFT tests. For task details, see How to Create and Import LeanFT Tests.
  8. Create requirements coverage

    Link each test in the test plan tree with a requirement or requirements in the requirements tree. By defining requirements coverage for a test, you keep track of the relationship between the tests in your test plan and your original requirements. For task details, see How to Create Coverage.

  9. Link a test to a defect

    Link a test to specific defects. This is useful, for example, when a new test is created specifically for a known defect. By creating a link, you can determine if the test should be run based on the status of the defect. For user interface details, see Linked Defects/Entities Page.

  10. Analyze test plan data

    Analyze the test plan by generating reports and graphs. Use one of the following:

    View dynamic graphs of test subjects In the test plan tree, select a test subject, and click the Live Analysis tab. For task details on generating live analysis graphs, see How to Generate Live Analysis Graphs.
    View test plan data in a graph On the Test Plan module menu, select Analysis > Graphs. For task details on generating graphs, see How to Generate a Graph.
    Create a report of test plan data On the Test Plan module menu, select Analysis > Project Report. For task details on creating reports, see How to Create Project Reports.

    For details on additional analysis tools in ALM, see How to Analyze Data in ALM.

  11. Establish a baseline

    After your test plan has been reviewed and approved, you can create a baseline. A baseline provides you with a snapshot of your test plan at a specific point in time. Use a baseline to mark any significant milestone in the application lifecycle. The baseline then serves as a point of reference against which changes can be compared. For task details, see How to Use Libraries and Baselines in ALM.

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