Test Set Types

After you design tests in the Test Plan module, you create a test sets tree in the Test Lab module. A test sets tree enables you to organize your testing needs by grouping test sets in folders and organizing them in different hierarchical levels in the Test Lab module. You assign each test set folder to a cycle. This enables you to group together test sets that will be run during the same cycle and analyze the progress of the cycle as you run your tests.

When defining a test set, you add instances of your selected tests to the test set. Each test instance contains a defined test configuration.

ALM provides the following types of test sets:

  • Functional test sets include automatic tests that check the application under test functions as expected. Tests in a Functional test set are scheduled in a timeslot to run on a server, without requiring user supervision. Available for: ALM Edition with the Lab Management Extension enabled.
  • Default test sets can include automatic and manual tests, and are used to check that the application under test functions as expected. Tests in a Default test set are controlled from the user’s machine and require the supervision of the tester.
  • Performance test sets include performance tests which check that the application under test can withstand load and demand. Tests in a Performance test set are scheduled in a timeslot to run on a server, without requiring user supervision. Available for: ALM Edition and LoadRunner Enterprise Edition only.

Note: For the purposes of this tutorial, we will only use Functional and Default test sets. The usage of Performance tests is covered in the LoadRunner Enterprise Quick Start guide.

To decide which types of test sets to create, consider the goals you defined at the beginning of the application lifecycle management process.

When creating and combining different groups of test sets, consider issues such as the current state of the application and the addition or modification of new features. Following are examples of general categories of test sets you can create:

Test Set Description
Sanity

Checks entire application at a basic level—focusing on breadth, rather than depth—to verify that the application is functional and stable. This set includes fundamental tests that contain positive checks, validating that the application is functioning properly. For example, in the Mercury Tours application, you could test whether the application opens and enables you to log in.

Regression

Tests the system in a more in-depth manner than a sanity set. This set can include both positive and negative checks. Negative tests attempt to fail an application to demonstrate that the application is not functioning properly.

Advanced Tests both breadth and depth. This set covers the entire application, and also tests the application’s advanced options. You can run this set when there is ample time for testing.
Function Tests a subsystem of an application. This could be a single feature or a group of features. For example, in the Mercury Tours application, a function set could test all activities related to booking a flight.