Calculating Projected Utilization

Projected utilization is how much the resource would be used if the assignment were made. If the resource will not be overallocated, projected utilization is less than 100%. If the resource will be overallocated, projected utilization is greater than 100%. Projected utilization is calculated by the sum of the total resource allocation and the total position forecast divided by the total resource capacity.

Projected Utilization = ( RA + PF ) / RC

where:

RA = resource allocation total
PF = position forecast total
RC = resource capacity total

Note: Projected utilization is calculated in hours. The totals used must be converted to hours before projected utilization can be calculated.

Example: Projected Utilization for William Klein

In the following example, William Klein is an application developer who currently has 75% of his time allocated in May to Project A. He is also planning to take two weeks of vacation in July.

Project B requires application developers for six months from May through October. Staffing requirements are three FTEs for May through August, tapering off to one FTE for September, and 1/2 FTE for October.

William Klein's allocation and capacity are:

Table 5-11. William Klein’s projected utilization calculations
 

May.

Jun.

Jul.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Total

Allocation

.75
(120 hrs)

0

0

0

0

0

.75
(120 hrs)

Capacity

1
(160 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

.5
(96 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

5.5
(944 hrs)

Position Forecast
(<= 1)

1
(160 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

.5
(88 hrs)

5.5
(936 hrs)

William Klein's projected utilization from May through October is:

( 120 + 936 ) / 944 = 119%

Example: Projected Utilization for Joseph Bank

In the following example, Joseph Bank is an application developer who has 50% of his time allocated in May and June to Project A and 100% of his time allocated in September and October to Project C. He is planning to take two weeks of vacation in August.

Project B requires application developers for six months from May through October. Staffing requirements are three FTEs for May through August, tapering off to one FTE for September, and 1/2 FTE for October. William Klein is expected to be allocated to the work in September and October.

Joseph Bank's allocation and capacity are:

Table 5-12. Joseph Bank’s projected utilization calculations
 

May.

Jun.

Jul.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Total

Allocation

.5
(80 hrs)

.5
(88 hrs)

0

0

1
(168 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

3
(512 hrs)

Capacity

1
(160 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

.5
(88 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

5.5
(944 hrs)

Position Forecast
(<= 1)

1
(160 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

0
(0 hrs)

0
(0 hrs)

4
(680 hrs)

Joseph Bank's projected utilization from May through October is:

( 512 + 680 ) / 944 = 126%

Example: Projected Utilization for Barbara Getty

In the following example, Barbara Getty is a Java developer who has no time allocated from May through October. She is not planning to take any vacation during that time.

Project B requires application developers for six months from May through October. Staffing requirements are three FTEs for May through August, tapering off to one FTE for September, and 1/2 FTE for October. William Klein is expected to be allocated to the work in September and October.

Barbara Getty's allocation and capacity are:

Table 5-13. Barbara Getty’s projected utilization calculations
 

May.

Jun.

Jul.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Total

Allocation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Capacity

1
(160 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

6
(1024 hrs)

Position Forecast
(<= 1)

1
(160 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(176 hrs)

1
(168 hrs)

0
(0 hrs)

0
(0 hrs)

4
(680 hrs)

Barbara Getty's projected utilization from May through October is:

( 0 + 680 ) / 1024 = 66%